A History of Education in the British Leeward Islands, 1838-1945

A History of Education in the British Leeward Islands, 1838-1945

A History of Education in the British Leeward Islands, 1838-1945

A History of Education in the British Leeward Islands, 1838-1945

Synopsis

This book examines the socials and economic forces that have shaped and constrained the development of education in the British Leeward Islands following emancipation. It offers a critique on British colonial education and highlights several noteworthy achievements despite financial and ideological problems. The dialectical nature of education in helping to shape as well as being shaped by the culture becomes evident.

Excerpt

The Leeward Islands, which Columbus visited in 1493, form the more northerly group of the Lesser Antillean chain, which stretches from Anguilla in the north to Grenada in the south. The Spaniards used the term Leeward Islands in contrast to the Windward group, which was more exposed to the north-east trade winds, and the name was gradually applied to the Virgin Islands and others further east. By 1660, those the British possessed were distinguished as “His Majesty's Leeward Caribbee Islands”, consisting of Antigua, St Christopher (St Kitts), Nevis, Montserrat and the Virgin Islands (Watkins, 1924). Barbuda was united with Antigua in 1825 and in 1882 Nevis was incorporated into the St Kitts–Anguilla subgroup. Dominica was part of the Leeward group from 1832 to 1940, but it is not included in this study; for as Douglas Hall (1971) has agreed, geographically and culturally, it is more a Windward than a Leeward Island. The name British Virgin Islands was applied in 1917 when the United States purchased some of the Virgin Islands from Denmark and called them the Virgin Islands of the United States. The Leeward Islands are all small by any definition. Antigua, with 108 square miles, is the largest, followed by St Kitts (68), Barbuda (62), British Virgin Islands (59), Montserrat (39), Nevis (36) and Anguilla (34). Table 1 shows the population of the Leeward Islands in 1844.

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