Modern Political Culture in the Caribbean

Modern Political Culture in the Caribbean

Modern Political Culture in the Caribbean

Modern Political Culture in the Caribbean

Synopsis

This groundbreaking book explores the political culture of the Caribbean in order to understand the idiosyncrasies of Caribbean politics.

Excerpt

What became evident already in the week following the terror attack on the World Trade Center in New York City is that within a few short hours the political culture of the United States noticeably changed. Clearly and without exaggeration, 11 September 2001 marked the end of the twentieth and the beginning of the twenty-first century - or, as one observer called it more dramatically, the end of the end of History (Zakaria 2001). While the twentieth century was the century of global wars between nations, of totalitarian regimes, of concentration camps and finally of the cold war, the US public and government were cured of their lingering fears of communism in a matter of hours. Without doubt, after about two decades of emphasis on free-market rhetoric, the primacy of politics and culture has re-emerged with an unimagined vengeance. The idea that compared to the unmitigated immediacy of economics in almost all aspects of life, the state, government and politics would wither and become inconsequential now appears to be absurd.

For the Caribbean there have been no such cataclysmic events that would redefine the region's central political concerns and values in such a short time. Nevertheless, even a casual observer will notice that culture and politics in the region are, despite similarities, negotiated . . .

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