Curriculum, Plans, and Processes in Instructional Design: International Perspectives

Curriculum, Plans, and Processes in Instructional Design: International Perspectives

Curriculum, Plans, and Processes in Instructional Design: International Perspectives

Curriculum, Plans, and Processes in Instructional Design: International Perspectives

Synopsis

Prominent researchers and practitioners from instructional design, as well as the learning sciences-from both the U.S. and around the world-have contributed to this volume. This volume is a valuable resource for graduate students, scholars, and researchers in the fields of instructional design and educational technology, as well as for those who wish to develop expertise in training in industrial, military, public and academic organizations.

Excerpt

Looking at the year 2000, Gustafson, Tillman, and Childs (1992) suggested that “we shall eventually find ourselves on the path toward a theory of instructional design” (p. 456) if instructional design (ID) is able to expand its intellectual basis in the not-too-distant future. In the year 2000, the suggestion was made (Gordon & Zemke, 2000) that ID in its current form is as good as dead because its foundation is not suitable for facing new societal and technological demands. Gordon and Zemke argued that education and training should accommodate a diverse, widely distributed set of students who need to learn and transfer complex cognitive skills to an increasingly varied set of real-world contexts and settings. When we take these pessimistic positions into consideration, the question arises as to what went wrong in an applied field of science that has contributed substantially to education and training. What happened—or what did not happen—within the field of ID in the last half of the previous century?

DIDACTICS AND ID

Constructing a theory (that serves both explanation and discovery) is a slow process that more often proceeds step-by-step by accretion and tuning than by sudden decisive changes and shifts of paradigms. Sometimes it takes centuries before a paradigm is rejected (cf. Kuhn, 1970). Accordingly, we can think of the history of education and its disciplines as a continuous process . . .

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