The Psychology of Work: Theoretically Based Empirical Research

The Psychology of Work: Theoretically Based Empirical Research

The Psychology of Work: Theoretically Based Empirical Research

The Psychology of Work: Theoretically Based Empirical Research

Synopsis

This edited volume is derived from a conference held in honor of Charles Hulin's contribution to the psychology of work. His research has carefully developed and tested theory related to job satisfaction, withdrawal from work, and sexual harassment. Edited by Hulin's students, The Psychology of Work discusses research in job satisfaction. This research shows that job satisfaction plays an essential role in theories of organizational behavior. Formal models are used, such as item response theory, structural equation modeling, and computational models. Three general and consistent themes in Hulin's research are represented in this book's chapters. The first theme is a focus on broad, general constructs, such as job satisfaction. The virtue of this approach is that a wide range of behavior can be explained by a small number of variables. The second theme involves the examination of the antecedents and consequences of job satisfaction. This theme is increasingly important because it ties research on job attitudes and job behaviors where links are consistently found to social attitudes and behaviors where links are rarely found. The third theme consists of Hulin's interest in the use of formal models to characterize and understand behavior. This volume is of interest to scholars and students in industrial/organizational psychology, human resources, organizational behavior, and management.

Excerpt

Jeanne Brett and Fritz Drasgow's collection of essays in honor of Chuck Hulin is a testimony to the breadth and depth of what the organizational sciences, in this case Industrial and Organizational Psychology and organizational behavior, have become. Breadth-wise, several essays address a traditional concern of the field—turnover and other forms of organizational withdrawal—but others focus on such topics as cross-cultural perspectives on the motivation to work, patterns of aggressive behavior in organizations, and the effects of ambient sexual harassment of women on men. Depth-wise, one finds, for example, a detailed and provocative analysis of the supposed ubiquity of evaluation. Moreover, the list of contributors is punctuated by some of the field's leading scholars (e.g., Dan Ilgen, Ed Locke, Terry Mitchell, Harry Triandis, and Howard Weiss), so, readers, justifiably, should expect a tantalizing read. We are pleased to feature Brett and Drasgow's collection in our LEA Series.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.