Making It in Public Relations: An Insider's Guide to Career Opportunities

Making It in Public Relations: An Insider's Guide to Career Opportunities

Making It in Public Relations: An Insider's Guide to Career Opportunities

Making It in Public Relations: An Insider's Guide to Career Opportunities

Synopsis

Making It in Public Relations is a comprehensive, realistic guide to everything one needs to know when pursuing a successful career in public relations. It is an introduction to public relations, written for students who want or need a definition of the profession to understand what they are moving into as a career. A thorough overview of the various roles and responsibilities involved in PR work, the different types of PR functions and activities, and its application in a variety of settings and scenarios are provided. In fulfilling the book's editorial role, author Leonard Mogel profiles the 10 largest public relations firms, life on the fast track at a small PR firm, how corporate communications is carried on at a large financial institution, and public relations for diverse organizations. It will be of interest to those studying public relations at the university level; recent mass communication, journalism, and public relations graduates; interns in public relations firms; and employees in other fields contemplating a move to this profession.

Excerpt

Then and now. I was a novice printing salesman canvassing the famous Brill Building in New York's Times Square district for prospective customers. The building's tenants were a mixed bag of song pluggers, song publishers, song writers, agents, and even a few bookies who somehow convinced the building's management that they were legit. I didn't care what they did as long as they needed letterheads, envelopes, and business cards, my specialty.

I would start my cold canvassing on the top floor and work my way down. On one of these sales calls I came upon the painted metal door of an office that had a half-dozen names listed, so I thought it had good business possibilities. Upon entering, I presented my card to the only person in the office, a slovenly character in his early thirties. He introduced himself as Richie Roberts (his name has been changed for the purpose of this book).

When I arrived, he was on his way out and asked me to join him for a drink. It was early in the day, but I figured this was a good way to become fast friends, especially if he paid. The drink turned out to be an egg cream, a New York delicacy made of carbonated water, chocolate syrup, and milk (no egg, no cream). He ordered two . . .

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