The Renaissance of American Indian Higher Education: Capturing the Dream

The Renaissance of American Indian Higher Education: Capturing the Dream

The Renaissance of American Indian Higher Education: Capturing the Dream

The Renaissance of American Indian Higher Education: Capturing the Dream

Synopsis

The Native American Higher Education Initiative (NAHEI), a W.W. Kellogg Foundation project, has supported the development and growth of centers of excellence at Tribal Colleges and Universities across the United States. These are centers of new thinking about learning and teaching, modeling alternative forms of educational leadership, and constructing new systems of post-secondary learning at Tribal Colleges and Universities. This book translates the knowledge gained through the NAHEI programs into a form that can be adapted by a broad audience, including practitioners in pre-K through postsecondary education, educational administrators, educational policymakers, scholars, and philanthropic foundations, to improve the learning and life experience of native (and non-native) learners.

Excerpt

The concept of providing higher education programs for native students through an American Indian university was first proposed at the turn of 20th century. The catalyst for the tribal college movement was in large part due to mainstream higher education's lack of attention and failure address the unique needs of American Indian and Alaskan Native students nationwide. However, it was not until the 1960s, during President Johnson's Great Society and war on poverty, which promoted community action programs on Indian reservations, that the social and political environment became conducive to the radical notion of tribal governments chartering and operating institutions of higher education for their own people. The movement was initially championed by a dedicated handful of educators, native and nonnative, who committed their professional careers to the success of educating Native American youth. Despite numerous challenges, tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) have proliferated since that time through their tenacity and unwillingness to fail.

In 1973, the leaders of the six original colleges (Dine College, D-Q University, Oglala Lakota College, Sinte Gleska University, Sitting Bull College, and Turtle Mountain Community College) created a parent organization, the American Indian Higher Education Consortium (AIHEC), to serve and represent them in that nationwide movement. In turn, AIHEC created the American Indian College Fund (AICF) in 1989, and later, was instrumental in establishing the AIHEC Student Congress 1990, and the Alliance for Equity in Higher Education 1999, all of which . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.