Walking in the Way of Peace: Quaker Pacifism in the Seventeenth Century

Walking in the Way of Peace: Quaker Pacifism in the Seventeenth Century

Walking in the Way of Peace: Quaker Pacifism in the Seventeenth Century

Walking in the Way of Peace: Quaker Pacifism in the Seventeenth Century

Synopsis

A synthesis of intellectual and social history, Walking in the Way of Peace investigates the historical context, meaning, and expression of early Quaker pacifism in England and its colonies. In a nuanced examination of pacifism, Weddle focuses on King Philip's War, which forced New England Quakers, rulers and ruled alike, to define the parameters of their peace testimony.

Excerpt

Aware of the collaborative character of scholarly enterprise, it is with gratitude that I recall those who have contributed their knowledge, wisdom, time, care, and “mundane” everyday assistance to my efforts. John Demos, Edmund Morgan, and David Underdown have given me inspiration of transforming quality, enhanced by friendship. My appreciation of their magnificent teaching in the largest sense only grows as the years pass.

Critical, thoughtful, and challenging assistance from Jon Butler, Diane Kunz, and Phyllis Mack has enhanced this study substantially. The Barbara S. Mosbacher Fellowship made possible concentrated and extended study at the John Carter Brown Library, where the Fellows program under Library Director Norman Fiering promotes scholarly cooperation at its best. I learned from all of my colleagues there (and from none more than Wim Klooster). Travel grants from the Yale Graduate School History Department and the Council on West European Studies aided periods of essential research in England.

The librarians at many institutions were crucial to this study. I particularly valued the skill, good spirit, and unending patience of the staff of the Sterling Memorial and Beinecke Libraries at Yale University, especially Barbara Gajewski, Evelyn McLellan, Frederick Musto, Clifford Johnson, and Stephen Jones. Malcolm Thomas, Josef Keith, and Sylvia Carlyle at Friends' House Library, London, were generous with their specialized knowledge, so vital to accessing their fine collection. Norman Fiering, Susan Danforth, Gwen Jones, and the entire staff at the John Carter Brown Library in Providence, Rhode Island, exemplify excellence. Unusually helpful, too, were Richard Stattler and Rosalyn Cobb Wiggin, archivists of the New England Yearly Meeting Collection of the Society of Friends; Robin Flynn at the Rhode Island Historical Society; J. Stephen Grimes at the Rhode Island Court . . .

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