Newman's Way: The Odyssey of John Henry Newman

Newman's Way: The Odyssey of John Henry Newman

Newman's Way: The Odyssey of John Henry Newman

Newman's Way: The Odyssey of John Henry Newman

Excerpt

There were three John Newmans. They were Grandfather John, whom we will call John I; his son, John II; and his grandson, who is known to us all as John Henry Newman. John I came from Cambridgeshire; from a place called Swaffham Bulbeck. He was a very poorman. When --to go still further back--his grandfather William had died, in 1742, he had left little to his heirs: a house, a common and eleven acres of land. He left to John I's father: "All these my three acres of arable land holden by Copy of Court Roll of the Manor of Brughall to him and to his heirs for ever." He left to his other four children the sum, each, of half-a- crown. He left a token also to John I, his little grandson: "All that Bed whereon I lye, with the Beadstead, Curtins, and appurtenances belonging to the same, to him and his heirs for ever."

Did this big tester-bed come swaying on a wagon from Cambridgeshire into Holborn? For it is in Holborn that we next come on John I, in 1763. He had been left orphaned of his father when in his teens, and as he was one of six children, and as three acres of arable land are poor sustenance for a widow with six children, it was natural that he should be sent off to London to seek his fortune. When we come upon him in 1763 he is twenty-nine. We find him in Holborn, behind the counter of a little shop in Leadenhall Street, selling groceries. He describes himself as a coffeeman. He is married. His wife, Elizabeth Good--who will . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.