Business Information at Work

Business Information at Work

Business Information at Work

Business Information at Work

Synopsis

As businesses grow less capital and infrastructure intensive and more people and knowledge intensive it becomes increasingly vital for today's managers to know what business information is available and how to apply it to their own decision-making processes. This book relates organisations' real information needs to specific types and named examples of information sources and services. The final chapter shows how to exploit the vast array of available information systematically, looking, for example, at the role of the information intermediary, the Internet and online hosts. This is a book no well-informed business should be without.

Excerpt

In many ways business information is as old as business itself; sought on the same subjects for the same reasons as it always was. In other ways, especially the wealth of it, and in the form of delivery, it has changed beyond recognition in recent years. This book is offered as a bridge in the gulf between the business decision maker and the new world of information waiting to be discovered. Businesses continue to grow less capital and infrastructure intensive, and more people intensive, and therefore knowledge intensive. The globalisation of both markets and communication, the expansion of ‘Ecommerce’, the increase in competition, and tightening of margins; all demand systematic exploitation of the corporate resource which is information. Experts assert that it is information management which will be the main strategic weapon of the first decade of the 21 century.

There is no time like the present for a manager to take business information seriously, and for boardrooms to implement convictions on the value of information, knowledge, and its scientific management. Proliferation of PCs, graphic user interfaces and the Internet are making the information or knowledge society a reality; internal and external information resources have become accessible, flexible and credible in the eyes of senior management. They are embracing terms like intranets, data mining, push technology, intelligent agents and disintermediation, for concepts which are not all quite so new. The suppliers of information are enthusiastically using the same knowledge imperative and IT revolution to reach more end-users more fruitfully than ever before, repackaging their products to attract any user with a networked PC, laptop or mobile phone. Much of the information industry is already concentrating on managing all the information now assaulting the decision maker, and avoiding the consequences of information overload.

The book is aimed at any user or potential user of business information, whether more a searcher, or more a consumer of the results. It aims to do something which is all too rare: to relate together the points of view of information providers, information professionals and business people. Building the bridge between business’ need and potential information, requires a considered view of this magic triangle of components. The book is theoretical in that it analyses and categorises relevant elements of businesses and external information, and practical to the extent that it relates real information needs to specific types and named examples of information sources and services.

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