The Making of Modern Europe, 1648-1780

The Making of Modern Europe, 1648-1780

The Making of Modern Europe, 1648-1780

The Making of Modern Europe, 1648-1780

Synopsis

This reissue of a classic textbook has been revised and updated with a new introduction by the author. Geoffrey Treasure provides a thoroughly comprehensive account of the European experience at a time when so much of what is today identified as 'modern' began to take shape.Bringing this period to life for students of early modern European history, Treasure focuses on the central theme of state growth, from the disorderly aftermath of the Thirty Years War to the beginning of the decade that was to prove the last of the 'ancient regime'.Discussing key issues of the period, The Making of Modern Europe examines:* the evolution of the developing society* detailed studies of the people, their environment, attitudes and beliefs* economic aspects* the growth of the states* politics, war and diplomacy* religion, intellectualism and science.This work provides an excellent grounding for the study of seventeenth and eighteenth-century European history.

Excerpt

In his collection of the most significant international treaties between 1648 and the year of its publication, 1773, the abbé de Mably offered the view that the treaties between nations had come to be endowed with the same authority as the civil legislation of individual states. Historians of Europe soon learn to be wary of such pronouncements. The abbé’s optimism was grounded in a perceived stability in interstate relations. But he was looking at Europe from the French windows of the Enlightenment. Poles, for example, victims of the previous year’s partition, would have another perspective. There would soon be a quite different view from the windows of the Jacobin Club in Revolutionary Paris, different again from Napoleon’s Malmaison.

Dealing with the same period, starting with the comprehensive peace of Westphalia, ending before the French Revolution brought instability and Napoleon created a new but short-lived European order, The Making of Modern Europe appeared in 1985. In the dozen years that I had been working on the book, the background to the teaching of European history had remained relatively stable. Grim though Communist regimes might be, stark the differences between the free world and the countries under Soviet domination, there was a recognizable European order. In retrospect, in the west at least, the clear boundaries epitomized by the Berlin Wall may even have seemed reassuring. People knew where they stood. Except where a policy failed, as did, catastrophically, that of the United States over Vietnam, there was little to shake confidence in traditional humane values. With the creation of new universities in Britain and enlarged departments in the old ones . . .

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