Handbook of International Research in Mathematics Education

Handbook of International Research in Mathematics Education

Handbook of International Research in Mathematics Education

Handbook of International Research in Mathematics Education

Synopsis

This state-of-the-art Handbook brings together important mathematics education research that makes a difference in both theory and practice--research that: *anticipates problems and needed knowledge before they become impediments to progress; *interprets future-oriented problems into researchable issues; *presents the implications of research and theory development in forms that are useful to practitioners and policymakers; and *facilitates the development of research communities to focus on neglected priorities or strategic opportunities. The volume represents a genuine attempt by contributors from around the world to advance the discipline, rather than simply review what has been done and what exists. The Handbook was developed in response to a number of major global catalysts for change, including the impact of national and international mathematics comparative assessment studies; the social, cultural, economic, and political influences on mathematics education and research; the influence of progressively sophisticated and available technology; and the increasing globalization of mathematics education and research. From these catalysts have emerged specific priority themes and issues for mathematics education research in the 21st century. Three key themes were identified for attention in this volume: *life-long democratic access to powerful mathematical ideas; *advances in research methodologies; and *influences of advanced technologies. Each of these themes is examined in terms of learners, teachers, and learning contexts, with theory development as an important component of all these aspects. Dynamic and forward looking, the Handbook of International Research in Mathematics Education is distinguished by its focus on new and emerging theoretical models, perspectives, and research methodologies; its uniformly high standard of scholarship; and its emphasis on the international nature of mathematics education research. It is an essential volume for all researchers, professionals, and students interested in mathematics education research in particular and, more generally, in international developments and future directions in the broad field of educational research.

Excerpt

This handbook is intended for those interested in international developments and future directions in educational research, particularly mathematics education research. The book was conceived in response to a number of major global catalysts for change, including the impact of national and international mathematics comparative assessment studies; the social, cultural, economic, and political influences on mathematics education and research; the influence of the increased sophistication and availability of technology; and the increased globalization of mathematics education and research.

From these catalysts for change have emerged a number of priority themes and issues for mathematics education research for the new millennium. Three key themes have been identified for inclusion in this handbook: lifelong democratic access to powerful mathematical ideas, advances in research methodologies, and influences of advanced technologies. Each theme is examined in terms of learners, teachers, and learning contexts, with theory development being an important component of all these aspects.

The book comprises four sections. The first, Priorities in International Mathematics Education Research, provides important background information on the key themes of the book and introduces new and emerging research trends in the field. Following my introductory chapter, Carol Malloy (chapter 2) explores democratic access to mathematics through democratic education, and Richard Lesh (chapter 3) looks at research design in mathematics education with a focus on design experiments. In chapter 4, James Kaput, Richard Noss, and Celia Hoyles examine the evolution of represen tational infras tructures and related artifacts and technologies; they also show how changes in represe ntational infrastructure are closely linked to “learnability and the democrat ization of intellectual power” (p. 73).

Section 2 of the handbook, Lifelong Democratic Access to Powerful Mathematical Ideas, is divided into two parts: Learning and Teaching and Learning Contexts and Policy Issues. With respect to learning and teaching, the authors consider students' learning during the preschool and beginning school years (Bob Perry and Sue Dockett, chapter 5), in the elementary and middle school years (Graham Jones, Cynthia Langrall, and Carol Thornton, chapter 6), in the secondary school (Teresa Rojano, chapter 7), and, finally, at the advanced levels of mathematics education (Joanna Mamona-Downs and Martin Downs, chapter 8). Issues pertaining to representation in mathematical learning and problem solving (Gerald Goldin, chapter 9), teacher education (Dina Tirosh and Ruhama Even, chapter 10), and theoretical aspects of school mathematics (Boero, Douek, and Ferrari, chapter 11) are also included in this first part of section 2.

The second part of section 2, Learning Contexts and Policy Issues, covers a range of globally significant topics such as access and opportunity within the political and social context of mathematics education (William Tate and Celia Rousseau, chapter 12), democratic access to mathematical learning in developing countries (Luis Moreno . . .

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