Becoming Biliterate: A Study of Two-Way Bilingual Immersion Education

Becoming Biliterate: A Study of Two-Way Bilingual Immersion Education

Becoming Biliterate: A Study of Two-Way Bilingual Immersion Education

Becoming Biliterate: A Study of Two-Way Bilingual Immersion Education

Synopsis

This book describes the development process and dynamics of change in the course of implementing a two-way bilingual immersion education program in two school communities. The focus is on the language and literacy learning of elementary-school students and on how it is influenced by parents, teachers, and policymakers. Perez provides rich, highly detailed descriptions, both quantitative and qualitative, of the change process at the two schools involved, including student language and achievement data for five years of program implementation that were used to test the basic two-way bilingual theory, the specific school interventions, and the particular classroom instructional practices. The contribution of Becoming Biliterate: A Study of Two-Way Bilingual Immersion Education is to provide a comprehensive description of contextual and instructional factors that might help or hinder the attainment of successful literacy and student outcomes in both languages. The study has broad theoretical, policy, and practical instructional relevance for the many other U.S. school districts with large student populations of non-native speakers of English. This volume is highly relevant for researchers, teacher educators, and graduate students in bilingual and ESL education, language policy, linguistics, and language education, and as a text for master's-and doctoral-level classes in these areas.

Excerpt

At a national congress of educators in Chicago, shortly after Bertha gave me this book to read, a group of colleagues from Teachers College, Columbia University, gathered to discuss issues of multiple languages and of multiple multimodal literacies. At that moment most of the panelists argued that the multiplicity of languages and of literacies created spaces in between that were worthy of study. Only one of the group members argued that a flower was a flower whether hybrid or not, questioning whether the study of multiplicity in languages or in literacy had anything new to add to the knowledge of languages or of literacies. The analogy to grafting (injertar in Spanish) was provocative but ultimately not contradictory to what others were saying. Actually, the scientific process of grafting/ injertar was more illustrative of what we wanted to get at—the process of hybridization (Arteaga, 1997; García Canclini, 1995) and transculturation (Ortiz, 1947)—which takes root in the borderlands (Anzaldúa, 1999) or contact zones (Pratt, 1992).

My point at the discussion in Chicago was that we needed to trace some of the origins of this kind of thinking, all of which are perhaps problematic but pointing in the same direction. So, I will take the liberty to digress to that point. When Fernando Ortiz (1947) first published Cuban Counterpoint, he was challenging the term acculturation as it was being used in the . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.