Job Feedback: Giving, Seeking, and Using Feedback for Performance Improvement

Job Feedback: Giving, Seeking, and Using Feedback for Performance Improvement

Job Feedback: Giving, Seeking, and Using Feedback for Performance Improvement

Job Feedback: Giving, Seeking, and Using Feedback for Performance Improvement

Synopsis

This book demonstrates how managers can be more effective in gathering and processing performance information about sub-ordinates, making ratings on performance appraisals and multisource feedback surveys, and feeding back this information in a way that is nonthreatening and leads to productive changes in behavior. It also shows how employees can gather, accept, and use meaningful performance information from appraisals, surveys, and informal discussions to change their own behavior. In doing so, the volume suggests how human resource practitioners and training professionals can help managers give and use feedback more effectively. Five years have elapsed since the first edition of Job Feedback was published. This revision covers the following updates in the field: new theory and research on organizational performance management; new methods for linking strategic planning with individual goal setting and development; the emergence of globalization and cross-cultural factors affecting performance evaluations and the use of technology to collect performance data; and new chapters on person perception, multisource feedback, team feedback, and feedback in multicultural organizations.

Excerpt

There is a compelling need for innovative approaches to the solution of many pressing problems involving human relationships in today's society. Such approaches are more likely to be successful when they are based on sound research and applications. This Series in Applied Psychology offers publications that emphasize state-of-the-art research and its application to important issues of human behavior in a variety of social settings. The objective is to bridge both academic and applied interests.

We know from psychological research that people need knowledge of results to accomplish performance goals and improve their performance over time. Feedback generally is acknowledged as an essential component of many management functions, such as providing training and development, setting goals, building teams, and evaluating job performance. In the first edition to his book, Job Feedback, Dr. Manuel London described how research and experience have shown that feedback often is the weak link in the management process. Managers feel uncomfortable giving feedback, especially when it is negative. Often they do not know how to make feedback a constructive experience, how often to give feedback, or how specific to make it without sounding self-serving. Managers often worry that the person receiving the feedback will be defensive, ignore the message, or blame the messenger.

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