Handbook of Infant, Toddler, and Preschool Mental Health Assessment

Handbook of Infant, Toddler, and Preschool Mental Health Assessment

Handbook of Infant, Toddler, and Preschool Mental Health Assessment

Handbook of Infant, Toddler, and Preschool Mental Health Assessment

Synopsis

The Handbook of Infant, Toddler, and Preschool Mental Health Assessment brings together for the first time, leading clinical researchers to provide empirically based recommendations for assessment of social-emotional and behaviour problems and disorders in the earliest years. Each author presents state-of-the-art information on scientifically valid, developmentally based clinical assessments and makes recommendations based on the integration of developmental theory,empirical findings, and clinical experience.Though the field of mental health assessment in infants and young children lags behind work with older children and adults, recent scientific advances, including new measures and diagnostic approaches, have led to dramatic growth in the field. The editors of this exciting new work have assembled an extraordinary collection of chapters that thoroughly discuss the conceptualizations of dysfunction in infants and young children, current and new diagnostic criteria, and such specific disorders assensory modulation dysfunction, sleep disorders, eating and feeding disorders, autistic spectrum disorders, anxiety disorders, posttraumatic stress disorder, and ADHD. Chapters further highlight the importance of incorporating contextual factors such as parent-child relationship functioning andcultural background into the assessment process to increase the validity of findings.Given the comprehensiveness of this groundbreaking volume in reviewing conceptual, methodological, and research advances on early identification, diagnosis and clinical assessment of disorders in this young age group, it will be an ideal resource for teachers, researchers, and a wide variety of clinicians including child psychologists, child psychiatrists, early intervention providers, early special educators, social workers, family physicians and paediatricians.

Excerpt

Culture is acknowledged as a significant factor in the assessment of psychological functioning and treatment of mental disorders (American Psychiatric Association, 1994; American Psychological Association, 1993; U. S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1999). Regarding infant mental health, the Diagnostic Classification of Mental Health and Developmental Disorders of Infancy and Early Childhood(DC: 0–3; Zero to Three, 1994) states that any intervention or treatment program should include an assessment of family functioning and cultural and community patterns in addition to developmental history, symptoms, and assessment of the child's current functioning.

According to the members of the work group charged with developing the Outline for Cultural Formulation in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV; American Psychiatric Association, 1994), there that the need to under stand culture has been growing recognition that psychiatric diseases need to be understood not only as biological processes, but rather, in the context of an illness experience, which is in part determined by cultural interpretations of the disease (Good, 1996). Kleinman (1988) was one of the first authors tolatio discuss the concepts of disease and illness in this way (Castillo, 1997). By considering disease in the context of an “illness experience, ” there is an acknowledgment that the experience of disease— that is, its symptoms, its remedy, and so on—is unique to a particular individual who is situated in a particular sociocultural context.

While the inclusion of the Outline for Cultural Formulation in DSM-IV has made a significant contribution to the assessment of adult psychological functioning in the context of culture (Manson, 1995), the field of infant mental health assessment has lagged behind (Yamamoto, 1997). This is not surprising, considering the newness of the field and the fact that appreciation of cultural factors in development in general has lagged behind other approaches (Shonkoff & Phillips, 2000; Super & Harkness, 1986). It is also not surprising that the need to understand culture has come increasingly into our awareness, given the changing demographics of the U. S. population. According to the U. S. Census Bureau (2000), minority and foreign-born groups are expected to constitute increasingly large segments of the total U. S. population over the next 50 years, while the current . . .

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