Studies in Classical History and Society

Studies in Classical History and Society

Studies in Classical History and Society

Studies in Classical History and Society

Synopsis

Professor Reinhold, a distinguished senior classicist, has produced a fascinating and accessible collection of essays devoted to the study of ancient history. Among the articles included are "The Generation Gap," a major survey exploring myths of the uprising of one generation against another; "Augustus' Conception of Himself," a detailed summary and interpretation of Augustus' life and career; and "The Declaration of War against Cleopatra," an investigation of the charge against Cleopatra that she betrayed her pledge to Rome as a client ruler. Taken together, these essays form a unified and coherent survey of ancient history that will appeal to a broad audience.

Excerpt

This collection of studies, culled from more than a half century of research, is derived from a multiplicity of influences. These began when I was a graduate student at Columbia University in New York City in the early 1930s. My interests in research were formed and motivated by two mentors and two friends and fellow students. Professor William Linn Westermann and Professor Charles Knapp influenced me in different directions. Professor Knapp, who was for thirty years editor of Classical Weekly, had an exquisite knowledge of the Latin language and Roman literature. He was a tyrant who demanded accuracy and complete documentation, and he was a perfectionist in editing. From Professor Westermann I learned the significance of Greek and Latin inscriptions and Greek papyri for a knowledge of ancient history.

My friend Naphtali Lewis shared with me his splendid knowledge of the Greek language. He is a masterful papyrologist and has been the international president of the Society of Papyrologists. From Moses I. Finley I acquired a lifelong interest in social and economic history. Finley, who immigrated to Britain and became a British citizen, was knighted and is better known as Sir M. I. Finley. Arnaldo Momigliano called Finley the greatest ancient historian of the middle of the twentieth century. the friendship of our triumvirate (as Professor Westermann called us) was commemorated in a banquet at Cambridge University on its fiftieth anniversary.

This book has been brought to the light of day by the editorial assistance of my young classicist friend Mark Anderson and by the encouragement of Susan Ford Wiltshire of Vanderbilt University, whose friendship and interest in my scholarship have been invaluable. My Boston University colleague Loren J. Samons happily provided a recent bibliography on the subjects in this volume. in addition, I owe my gratitude to historians Robert Drews and Thomas McGinn of Vanderbilt University for assistance with editing and to Tommye Corlew for her caring and careful preparation of the manuscript.

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