Media Writing: Print, Broadcast, and Public Relations

Media Writing: Print, Broadcast, and Public Relations

Media Writing: Print, Broadcast, and Public Relations

Media Writing: Print, Broadcast, and Public Relations

Excerpt

When the first edition of Media Writing-was conceptualized in the mid-1990s, industry predictions were that media were coming together in “convergence, ” spurred by the increasingly interrelated technologies of computer, telephone, and TV. Specialization by media, it was said, was on its way out. Print and broadcast journalists and public relations practitioners would not be merely reporters and writers but would increasingly be in the information-processing business, requiring overlapping skills. America Online president Steve Case was quoted in Broadcasting magazine as noting that media companies were positioning themselves to take advantage of a synergy of print and video and interactive technologies and, even before the AOL-Time Warner merger, that future media companies would be those that successfully combined the three.

Those optimistic predictions were slightly off, of course. The full impact of convergence has been battered by the collapse of the dot.coms and the subsequent decline in stock values across media properties. On the other hand, hundreds of newspapers have introduced an online presence, many with real-time streaming audio and video. The Chicago Tribune and WGN radio and television have a convergent news operation, as does the Tampa Tribune and a local TV station. The Philadelphia Inquirer, the Philadelphia Daily News, three regional newspapers, a local television outlet and 50 radio stations have teamed up in an interactive Web site. The pattern is replicated in many other markets around the country, where broadcast and print reporters prepare copy for each other's medium. Additionally, many corporations and nonprofit organizations are using computer technology to provide newsworthy information directly to their publics.

Instead of being merely writers and reporters, print and broadcast journalists and public relations practitioners increasingly find themselves in the business of information-processing and dissemination. Tomorrow's newswriters will need to be able to write a piece of newspaper copy designed to be read and then converted to . . .

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