New Directions in Human Associative Learning

New Directions in Human Associative Learning

New Directions in Human Associative Learning

New Directions in Human Associative Learning

Synopsis

The editor and authors of this book present a synthesis of work on human associative learning, tracing some of its historical roots but concentrating mainly on recent developments. It is divided into three sections: an introduction to the recent data and controversies in the study of human associative learning; recent developments in the formal theories of how associative learning occurs; and applied work on human associative learning, particularly its application to depression and to the development of preferences. The book is designed to be accessible to undergraduates, providing a clear illustration of how principles most commonly introduced in animal cognition courses are relevant to the contemporary study of human cognition.

Excerpt

April 2003 marked the centenary of Pavlov's first public presentation on the conditioned reflex, work that subsequently made him one of the best-known figures in psychology. Pavlov's contribution to the study of animal cognition is well known, but two international symposia held last spring at Exeter and Cardiff universities underlined his influence on the study of human cognition. New Directions in Human Associative Learning collects together previously unpublished work presented at these symposia in to an integrated volume. It seeks to introduce the reader to some of the cutting-edge theories and findings in the study of the cognitive processes that underlie associative learning processes in humans.

This book is designed to be accessible to undergraduates, providing a clear illustration of how the principles of animal cognition studied in introductory and intermediate-level courses apply to the contemporary study of human cognition. It would be ideal as supplementary reading for an intermediate-level animal or human cognition course, and as a core text for a senior-level seminar option in human learning processes. A high school level of familiarity with mathematics is assumed.

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