Motivated Social Perception

Motivated Social Perception

Motivated Social Perception

Motivated Social Perception

Synopsis

This volume highlights state-of-the-art research on motivated social perception by the leaders in the field. Recently a number of researchers developed influential accounts of how motivation affects social perception. Unfortunately, this work was developed without extensive contact between the researchers, and therefore evolved into two distinct traditions. The first tradition shows that the motivation to maintain a positive self-concept and to define oneself in the social world can dramatically affect people's social perception. The second one shows that people's goals have a dramatic effect on how they see themselves and others. Motivated Social Perception shows how these two approaches often overlap and provides insights into how these two perspectives are integrated. Motivated Social Perception contains chapters on: *the effect of motivation on the activation and application of stereotypes; *self-affirmation in the evaluations of the self and others; *implicit and explicit aspects of self-esteem; *self-esteem contingencies and relational aspects of the self; *an investigation of the roots and functions of basic goals; and *extensions of self-regulatory theory. This book is intended for scholars, researchers, and advanced students interested in social perception and social cognition.

Excerpt

The Ninth Ontario Symposium on Personality and Social Psychology was held at the University of Waterloo, May, 27-28, 2000. The topic of the symposium was motivated social perception, and the presentations covered a diverse set of issues related to this topic. As has become the fortunate custom of the Ontario Symposia, the articles generated many thoughtful discussions among the participants and approximately 75 additional audience members (25 faculty and 50 graduate students) from more than 15 universities from Canada, the U. S., and Japan.

The volume consists of the expanded and updated version of articles initially presented at the conference, and two additional related articles. The span of time between the conference and the publication of the book is the result of giving authors an opportunity to revise their articles based on feedback obtained from other participants and audience members, as well as the editors.

The way that each chapter in this volume examines social perception can be loosely categorized in the following sequence: the effect of motivation on the activation and application of stereotypes (chapters 1 and 2), self-affnmation in the evaluations of the self and others (chapters 3 and 4), implicit and explicit aspects of self-esteem (chapters 5 and 6), self-esteem contingencies and relational aspects of the self (chapter 7 to 9), an investigation of the roots and functions of basic goals (chapters 10 and 11), extensions of self-regulatory theory (chapter 12 and 13) and finally an integrative summary (chapter 13). Specifically in chapter 1, Kunda, Davies, Hoshino-Browne, and Jordan analyze how comprehension goals affect the time course of stereotype activation. In chapter 2, Fein, Hoshino-Browne, Davies, and Spencer examine how self-image maintenance goals and social norms interact to determine the activation and application of stereotypes In chapter 3, Dunning provides an overview of the research from his lab that demonstrates how people use their evaluations of themselves and others to affirm themselves. In chapter 4, McGregor demonstrates how people compensate for feelings of uncertainty by strengthening their convictions. In chapter 5, Koole and Pelham analyze the history and utility of the name letter effect as a measure of implicit self-esteem. In chapter 6, Jordan, Spencer, and Zanna examine how people who are high in explicit self-esteem but low in implicit self-esteem respond defensively to selfimage threats. In chapter 7, Wolfe and Cracker provide an analysis of the interaction between goals and contingencies of self-esteem in determining behavior. In chapter 8, Baldwin analyzes contingencies of self-esteem from an expectancy value perspective. In chapter 9, Bargh, Fitzsimmons, and McKenna examine how people find their true selves in discussions on the intemet and how this facilitates the development of relationships. In chapter 10, Schaller analyzes how our evolutionary history may have prepared us to respond to certain . . .

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