UN Peace-Keeping Operations: A Guide to Japanese Policies

UN Peace-Keeping Operations: A Guide to Japanese Policies

UN Peace-Keeping Operations: A Guide to Japanese Policies

UN Peace-Keeping Operations: A Guide to Japanese Policies

Synopsis

Why is participation in UN peace-keeping and humanitarian operations such a sensitive issue for Japanese policymakers? Although Japan is among the United Nations' most enthusiastic supporters, it has only recently begun to send its Self-Defense Forces to assist UN peace operations. In this book, three experts unravel the political and legal complexities that bedevil Japanese officials in their attempts to cooperate with these missions. A comprehensive historical overview of Japan's peace-keeping policy provides readers with the background to understand this contentious issue. Two sections offer a detailed look at Japanese participation in recent UN peace operations and at the complex decisionmaking process that preceded this. The longest section is devoted to in-depth analysis of the legal aspects of Japan's peace-keeping policy, particularly the constraints under which policymakers operate. The final section details Japanese and civilian participation in UN peace operations. L. William Heinrich Jr. is a research associate with the Export-Import Bank of Japan in New York City. Akiho Shibata is associate professor of international law at Okayama University Faculty of Law. Yoshihide Soeya is professor of political science in the Faculty of Law, Keio University.

Excerpt

This handbook covers the main aspects of Japan's policy on UN peace operations. the term “peace operation” refers to both civilian and military efforts under the direction of the United Nations for the purpose of preventing, terminating, or recovering from conflicts. This volume aims to provide the reader with a better understanding of the political, legal, and economic factors that shape Japan's policy toward both military and civilian participation in these operations.

The issue of whether and how Japan should participate in collective security – a broad term that encompasses un peace operations – has been the subject of profound disagreement in Japan from the moment the United Nations came into existence in 1945. in the years following the 1954 decision to re-establish a fullfledged military organization (the Self-Defence Forces – SDF), a fundamental tension developed between conservative political forces, which claimed that Japan had a responsibility to cooperate with the United Nations for global peace and security, and progressive political forces, which urged restraint in using military force. Despite the concerted efforts of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, opponents of the military effectively barred the sdf from participating in un peace operations throughout the Cold War period, an outcome that was strongly . . .

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