Statistics for Psychologists: An Intermediate Course

Statistics for Psychologists: An Intermediate Course

Statistics for Psychologists: An Intermediate Course

Statistics for Psychologists: An Intermediate Course

Synopsis

Built around a problem solving theme, this book extends the intermediate and advanced student's expertise to more challenging situations that involve applying statistical methods to real-world problems. Data relevant to these problems are collected and analyzed to provide useful answers. Building on its central problem-solving theme, a large number of data sets arising from real problems are contained in the text and in the exercises provided at the end of each chapter. Answers, or hints to providing answers, are provided in an appendix. Concentrating largely on the established SPSS and the newer S-Plus statistical packages, the author provides a short, end-of-chapter section entitled Computer Hints that helps the student undertake the analyses reported in the chapter using these statistical packages.

Excerpt

Psychologists (and even those training to be psychologists) need little persuading that a knowledge of statistics is important in both the design of psychological studies and in the analysis of data from such studies. As a result, almost all undergraduate psychology students are exposed to an introductory statistics course during their first year of study at college or university. The details of the topics covered in such a course will no doubt vary from place to place, but they will almost certainly include a discussion of descriptive statistics, correlation, simple regression, basic inference and significance tests, p values, and confidence intervals. In addition, in an introductory statistics course, some nonparametric tests may be described and the analysis of variance may begin to be explored. Laudable and necessary as such courses are, they represent only the first step in equipping students with enough knowledge of statistics to ensure that they have a reasonable chance of progressing to become proficient, creative, influential, and even, perhaps, useful psychologists. Consequently, in their second or third years (and possibly in later postgraduate courses), many psychology students will be encouraged to learn more about statistics and, equally important, how to apply statistical methods in a sensible fashion. It is to these students that this book is aimed, and it is hoped that the following features of the text will help it reach its target.

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