The World of John Cleaveland: Family and Community in Eighteenth-Century New England

The World of John Cleaveland: Family and Community in Eighteenth-Century New England

The World of John Cleaveland: Family and Community in Eighteenth-Century New England

The World of John Cleaveland: Family and Community in Eighteenth-Century New England

Excerpt

The social history of colonial America is most often written about the country folk, and its intellectual history about the urban elites. But the mentalité of the rural majority is no less important than that of the urban leadership. Studying in all its aspects the life of one village and its minister provides a unique perspective on the historical evolution of rural New England and on the social and intellectual context of the American Revolution in that region.

The Reverend John Cleaveland (1722-1799) was minister in Chebacco Parish (Ipswich, Massachusetts) during the second half of the eighteenth century. Born in eastern Connecticut, he came in 1746 to a village plunged into turmoil and confusion by the Great Awakening. An evangelical Calvinist out of Yale College, he began his life in Chebacco preaching to New Light dissidents and then gradually reunited the community under his care. He married a local woman and spent the rest of his long life as a farmer and a preacher in the little village on Massachusetts's North Shore. More than two hundred family letters, several short diaries and journals (including two kept by his wife), more than one hundred and fifty sermons, and some scattered accounts and financial records have survived from his long tenure; they provide a revealing picture of the life of a . . .

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.