Aldo Leopold and the Ecological Conscience

Aldo Leopold and the Ecological Conscience

Aldo Leopold and the Ecological Conscience

Aldo Leopold and the Ecological Conscience

Synopsis

In Aldo Leopold and an Ecological Conscience ecologists, wildlife biologists, and other professional conservationists explore the ecological legacy of Aldo Leopold and his A Sand County Almanac and his contributions to the environmental movement, the philosophy of science, and natural resource management. Twelve personal essays describe the enormous impact he has had on each author, from influencing the daily operations of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the creation of a land-use ethics guide for Forest Service personnel, to much needed inspiration for continuing on in today's large, complex and often problematic world of science. Here is Aldo Leopold as a mentor, friend, and companion and an affirmation of his hope that science will continue to be practiced in the cause of conservation.

Excerpt

Through his own intellectual evolution, Aldo Leopold advanced the development of ecological science. He recognized ecology as the fusion point of science and the land community. Today, grounded in ecology, we have begun to understand that solving environmental issues necessitates connecting theory and facts across many disciplines and infusing our ecological knowledge with a sense of wonder and passion. The authors of these essays reveal the need to regain a sustainable relationship to place, community, and the natural world—to the land that supports all life.

The need for integration is a common theme among ecologists. In his important book Consilience, E. O. Wilson writes, “The greatest enterprise of the mind has always been, and always will be, the attempted linkage of the sciences and humanities. The ongoing fragmentation of knowledge and resulting chaos in philosophy are not reflections of the real world but artifacts of scholarship”(1998, 8). However, powerful trends in modern science, spurred by the growth of new technologies, lead away from integration of knowledge and toward ever greater specialization. The recent announcement of the successful mapping of the human genome is only one example of the increasing scientific focus on microscopic and submicroscopic levels of biological organization. As revealing of life as these are, knowledge without . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.