Shame: Theory, Therapy, Theology

Shame: Theory, Therapy, Theology

Shame: Theory, Therapy, Theology

Shame: Theory, Therapy, Theology

Synopsis

This interdisciplinary study brings together many contemporary discourses about shame within a new critical perspective. It will be an invaluable, stimulating resource for all those who are concerned with understanding shame and assisting those whose lives are lived in the shadow of it. Psychologists, philosophers and therapists will find this a fascinating source of new insight into the theory and phenomenology of shame. It will be of particular interest to those who are interested in relationships between religion and mental health, to pastoral workers, and to religious thinkers and theorists.

Excerpt

It has been said that authors know how their books are going to end as they start at the beginning. If this is generally true, the present volume is a dramatic exception. Almost until the last moment of writing, I have lived with the anxiety of not been able to see quite where the book was going and how it would finish. It has been a confusing and daunting voyage of discovery, replete with wrong turns, false leads and conceptual mirages. In other words, this book is the product of a genuine process of research, with all the excitement and frustration that implies.

I owe substantial authorial debts. Alastair Campbell first stimulated my interest in shame by requiring me to write an essay on chronic guilt. His book The Gospel of Anger also offered an important, inspiring model of how practical theologians might begin to think about emotions. Donald Capps, an American pastoral theologian, always seems to have visited the topics I am interested in before me. His own work on shame, though I am sometimes sharply critical of it, has been a constant stimulus to me. Alex Wright at Cambridge University Press commissioned this volume and encouraged me enormously by reading it in draft. I am grateful to him and to his successor, Kevin Taylor, for the patience they have exercised in waiting for it gradually to emerge. On the technical side of this book's production, I would also like to thank Joanne Hill, the assiduous copy-editor at the Press who greatly improved the text in the final stages of its production, and James Woodward, an old friend who kindly compiled the index.

This book would never have seen the light of day without the privilege of uninterrupted time for thinking and writing. This came in the form of a research fellowship in the Department of Religious and Theological Studies at Cardiff University. Cardiff has been extraordinarily generous to me, both institutionally and in the form of forbearing colleagues who have tolerated more absence than presence on my part. I want to thank the University and, more particularly, my line manager . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.