Due Respect: Essays on English and English-Related Creoles in the Caribbean in Honour of Professor Robert le Page

Due Respect: Essays on English and English-Related Creoles in the Caribbean in Honour of Professor Robert le Page

Due Respect: Essays on English and English-Related Creoles in the Caribbean in Honour of Professor Robert le Page

Due Respect: Essays on English and English-Related Creoles in the Caribbean in Honour of Professor Robert le Page

Synopsis

Professor Robert Le Page was a pioneer in the field of English and Creole linguistics in the Caribbean. This collection of papers in honour of Le Page addresses a variety of topics in the field, pointing out the ways in which Le Page and his work have influenced, stimulated or been ignored by others.

This is the first book on Caribbean language studies to include original sections on language in education, speakers' behaviour in informal discourse and language structure. Based on sound linguistic scholarship, the thirteen chapters are organized in three sections: Pedagogical/Sociological; Structure; and Discourse.

Caribbean linguists have long been concerned that the findings of scholars in this field have been inaccessible to teachers and others interested in linguistics in the Caribbean. This book is geared for a wide audience, including school teachers, university students and teachers of linguistics in the Caribbean and the USA, and researchers on Creole languages.

Excerpt

Pauline Christie

The Le Pagean View of Language

This volume appropriately reflects the slogan which was adopted by the University of the West Indies for its fiftieth anniversary celebrations in 1998: "Celebrating the Past, Charting the Future". For a few of the contributors, Professor Le Page is a figure of whom they have only vaguely heard, one whose name they may associate mainly with the Dictionary of Jamaican English (Cassidy and Le Page [1967] 1980). Others are his former students. Still others have, in various ways, been closely associated with him and his work over many years. Despite these differences, in paying tribute to him as a pioneer in this collection of essays, they are all revisiting or opening up for the first time one or more routes along which future research on Caribbean language might proceed. the past and the future are never altogether separate. Forty years on the work continues, building on foundations which others, outstanding among them Robert Le Page, have laid.

Le Page's exposure to language in the Caribbean and Malaysia radically changed his thinking on the subject. His National Language Question (1964) raised the topical issue of language choices facing newly independent nations, including those of the Caribbean. It was followed in 1968 by "Problems to Be Faced in the Use of English as the Medium of Instruction in Four West Indian Territories" and "Problems of Description in Multilingual Communities", titles which speak for themselves. Discussion of language in the . . .

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