Dealing with Depression: A Commonsense Guide to Mood Disorders

Dealing with Depression: A Commonsense Guide to Mood Disorders

Dealing with Depression: A Commonsense Guide to Mood Disorders

Dealing with Depression: A Commonsense Guide to Mood Disorders

Synopsis

Covering both traditional and alternative approaches to treating depression, this fully revised and updated guide outlines the many different types of depression, including mood swings, clinical depression, and bipolar disorders. Each type of depression is explained fully and is accompanied by suggestions for the most appropriate treatments. Simple descriptions and a user-friendly layout make this guide accessible for those suffering from mood disorders, their families, and the health professionals who care for them. Expanded sections on bipolar disorders and the influence of personality styles on nonmelancholic disorders are included in this new edition, and an online diagnostic test associated with the book encourages confidence in self-diagnosis and in seeking professional care.

Excerpt

Depression is … a noun with a bland tonality and lacking any magisterial presence, used indifferently to describe an economic decline or a rut in the ground, a true wimp of a word for such a major illness.

William Styron, Darkness Visible

Others imply that they know what it is like to be depressed because they have gone through a divorce, lost a job or broken up with someone. But these experiences carry with them feelings. Depression, instead, is flat, hollow, and unendurable.

Kay Jamison, An Unquiet Mind

The depressive disorders comprise our most common, and most commonly misdiagnosed, psychological illnesses. While we cannot claim to cover every aspect of depression or offer any miracle cures, Dealing with Depression is written for those suffering depression themselves, the families and friends of those with depression and professionals who want to know more about these conditions and their treatments.

In attempting to make people aware of the high incidence of depression and its impact on the community, definitions of depression have been progressively redefined and oversimplified in communications to patients and the public. The current dominant model views depression as an 'it'—that is, a single entity rather . . .

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