Architects to the Nation: The Rise and Decline of the Supervising Architect's Office

Synopsis

This unique and carefully researched study traces the evolution and accomplishments of the Office of the Supervising Architect of the United States - the office that from 1852 until 1939 held a virtual monopoly over federal building design. Among its more memorable buildings are the Italianate U.S. Mint in Carson City, the huge granite pile of the State, War, and Navy Building in Washington, D.C., the towering U.S. Post Office in Nashville, New York City's neo-Renaissance customhouse, and such "restorations" as the ancient adobe Palace of the Governors in Santa Fe. In tracing the evolution of the Office and its creative output, Antoinette J. Lee evokes the nation's considerable efforts to achieve an appropriate civic architecture.

Additional information

Contributors:
Includes content by:
  • William Seale
Publisher: Place of publication:
  • New York
Publication year:
  • 2002

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