New Caribbean Thought: A Reader

New Caribbean Thought: A Reader

New Caribbean Thought: A Reader

New Caribbean Thought: A Reader

Synopsis

This interdisciplinary collection is the first to cross traditionally restrictive disciplinary barriers to address the tough questions that face the Caribbean today. What went wrong with the nationalist project? What, if any, are the realistic options for a more prosperous Caribbean? What are to be the roles of race, gender and class in a more global, less national world? Meeks and Lindahl include thought-provoking articles from twenty-one respected thinkers in diverse fields of study. The groundbreaking articles include critiques of existing bodies of thought, reformulations of general theoretical approaches, policy-oriented alternatives for future development, and more.

Excerpt

In the brilliant afternoon sun of 19 October 1983, on the highest parade ground of the old fort recently renamed after his father, Maurice Bishop, prime minister of revolutionary Grenada, was shot to death alongside some of his closest comrades. At the other end of the Soviet-built AK47 automatic rifles were soldiers of the People's Revolutionary Army, of which Bishop, only days before, had been the respected commander in chief.

In a bizarre sequence of events — the exact order of which remains an issue of bitter dispute sixteen years later — Bishop's prestige had, in the eyes of many of his supporters in the ruling New Jewel Movement, plummeted: from the unassailable position of jefe maximo, he had in the weeks before been placed under house arrest and was now being described as a potential counterrevolu‐ tionary. To the average man in the street, this volte-face, without either reason or explanation and without any prior warning, was completely unacceptable. Firm supporters of the revolution rallied to its leader and leading symbol of the social and economic gains of the previous, hectic, four years; firm opponents — many of whom had always been wary of the cocky, freewheeling élan of the 'Jewel Boys' — saw the detention as proof of their worst fears and joined the groundswell against the party and its remaining leaders.

Then, in a massive outpouring of popular support, they marched to free Bishop from his residence, located on one of the many hills overlooking the . . .

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