Making Men into Fathers: Men, Masculinities, and the Social Politics of Fatherhood

Making Men into Fathers: Men, Masculinities, and the Social Politics of Fatherhood

Making Men into Fathers: Men, Masculinities, and the Social Politics of Fatherhood

Making Men into Fathers: Men, Masculinities, and the Social Politics of Fatherhood

Synopsis

Prominent scholars in gender studies and the critical studies of men consider herein how varied institutional settings and policy influence the development of new models of fatherhood, and determine choices. The authors provide new insights from different historical and societal perspectives into the studies of men as gendered subjects, including the role of transnational and global issues on the practices of fatherhood, and the emergence of men's movements in contesting and reimaging fatherhood.

Excerpt

There is a chapter missing from this book, a chapter about the making of Making Men into Fathers. It would begin in 1995 in Stockholm in a conference room on the twenty-fifth floor overlooking the harbor. the chapter would try (most likely in vain) to recapture those first three days of intense conversations between the authors of this book, several of whom are central figures in the international debates on gender and welfare states, and two of whom are among the leading figures in the critical studies of men.

Over the next four years the authors of this book met many times, sometimes in the heart of the dark Swedish winter. Our conversations continued; our friendships developed. Our dialogues cut across borders, both geographic and disciplinary. We challenged and energized each other, particularly the junior scholars, Anna Gavanas, Helena Bergman, and Livia Oláh, who brought new perspectives and ideas to our discussions. the original title of the project, Fathers and the State, was discarded since it did not capture the dynamic and complex processes we were writing about. Nor did it encompass the multidimensional views of the authors or of the book, which were being continuously reconfigured and recast in our discussions, through our heuristic triangles. Trudie Knijn presented her rotating and overlapping triangles (the institutional and domestic); David Morgan his inspirational third father triangle. Ann Orloff kept up the provocative questions about men's interests. My scholarship has been enriched by the making of this book. in addition I developed a deep sense of what collaboration meant in terms of the framing of a book, its theories and core concepts. Ifeel privileged to have been able to bring together this excellent group of scholars and to learn so much from them.

By providing generous program grants designed to develop new research areas, the Riksbankens Jubeleumsfond made possible this kind of creative and exciting endeavor. Iacknowledge the important role played by the director, Dan Brandström. the many books and theses that have resulted from this research program are indebted to his strong support . . .

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