The Life of Antoinette Micolon

Synopsis

About The Life of Antoinette Micolon Antoinette Micolon (1592-1659) was a remarkable woman who founded six Ursuline convents in the Auvergne region of France in the early years of the seventeenth century. The Ursulines, originally founded in Italy as an uncloistered congregation, were one of the new "active" religious orders for women. Through their work as catechizers, teachers, and missionaries, women like Antoinette Micolon were crucial to both shaping and disseminating the ideals of the Catholic Reformation. Her story gives us a vivid and detailed picture of the creation and spread of the new religious congregations for women during this period, of the motivations of and the difficulties faced by the women who joined them, and of their relationships with their families, communities, and church officials. As an example of the growing genre of religious memoir during this period, her story also provides insight into the fashioning of identity in early modern France. This book makes available in English translation an invaluable resource for the history of women in Counter-Reformation France, and its dual language format make it ideal for use in both history and literature courses.

Additional information

Publisher: Place of publication:
  • Milwaukee
Publication year:
  • 2004

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