Feminist Poetics of the Sacred: Creative Suspicions

Feminist Poetics of the Sacred: Creative Suspicions

Feminist Poetics of the Sacred: Creative Suspicions

Feminist Poetics of the Sacred: Creative Suspicions

Synopsis

This book is an interdisciplinary and multicultural study of ancient and contemporary texts that encode women's spirituality. The contributors, using modern critical methods such as feminist theory, poststructuralism, and the new historicisms, examine how the ideas in these texts are being reworked in different religious traditions. The volume encompasses both contemporary and historical contexts, tracing the roles, actions, writings, and beliefs of women in pre-Christian, Christian, Islamic, indigenous, and neo-pagan contexts. The book builds on three decades of feminist research into such areas as goddess worship, indigenous spiritualities, eco-feminism, biblical hermeneutics, Christian and Islamic mysticism, subversive poetics, and mythological systems inside and outside the mainstream.

Excerpt

As an Aboriginal woman living within contemporary Australian society, being engulfed in the growing trend of gender concerns and awareness, and as a womanist scholar, I cannot overlook the enormous void in academic literature regarding the role of Aboriginal women in the many recordings of history, anthropology, and religious studies. This male-dominated world of scholarship has presented a very unbalanced view of Aboriginal society. Further, when Aboriginal women happen to be given a mention, it is usually in the form of a racist and sexist stereotype, sustaining white ideology of racial supremacy and male domination. Nancy Williams and Lesley Jolly have acknowledged that, unfortunately, many of their

Predecessors believed that the white race had a superior culture and religion and was at a far higher stage of evolution than the black race, whom they often viewed as curious living fossils akin to the marsupials (Spencer and Gillen 1927), doomed to extinction in the march of evolutionary progress. Yet for present purposes, it is the gender bias of the recorders that creates the most difficulty. To begin with, most of the writers were men, a fact that . . .

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