The Catholic Revolution: New Wine, Old Wineskins, and the Second Vatican Council

The Catholic Revolution: New Wine, Old Wineskins, and the Second Vatican Council

The Catholic Revolution: New Wine, Old Wineskins, and the Second Vatican Council

The Catholic Revolution: New Wine, Old Wineskins, and the Second Vatican Council

Synopsis

"Few scholars in our period have clarified the profound changes that have occurred in American Catholicism as well as Andrew Greeley has. This is a stunning and genuinely new interpretation of those radical shifts in Catholic thought post Vatican II."--David Tracy, University of Chicago

"Greeley tackles the big question of how the Roman Catholic Church could be in such deep trouble just a generation removed from its biggest reform. In this timely review of the last forty years, he reveals his mastery of both church politics and popular religious feelings. once again he shows us why millions of American Catholics trust him to be their voice."--Mike Hout, Professor of Sociology, University of California, Berkeley

Excerpt

This book is about the revolutionary impact of the Second Vatican Council on the Catholic Church in the United States. I note at the outset that I do not like the misuse of the word “revolution” as a metaphor, a shallow media paradigm for change. The socalled sexual revolution was not in fact a revolution but an increase in premarital sex along with a decline in age at first sexual activity, an increase in the divorce rate, and a steady increase in nudity in films. There has not been an increase in the frequency of sexual intercourse nor, it would seem, in the satisfaction from that activity. It is still true that most sexual activity (and the most satisfying) is between permanently committed partners. More nudity has not made for better films. Moreover, disapproval of extramarital sex has not declined. Change? Yes. Dramatic change? Perhaps. A complete overturning of values and practices? Hardly.

Most claims of revolution are an abuse of language, abuse that is inevitable when thought must be reduced to fit a 30-second TV clip or a 750-word press release. Before I began to think about . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.