Performing Ethnomusicology: Teaching and Representation in World Music Ensembles

Performing Ethnomusicology: Teaching and Representation in World Music Ensembles

Performing Ethnomusicology: Teaching and Representation in World Music Ensembles

Performing Ethnomusicology: Teaching and Representation in World Music Ensembles

Synopsis

"Both original and stimulating, this book presents widely known material in a highly theorized and organized manner. Very few authors write about the experiences ethnomusicologists confront while teaching in world music ensembles. The issues this book examines--representation, authenticity, performance practice, to name a few--are of great importance to the fields of ethnomusicology, anthropology, and related disciplines."--Katherine J. Hagedorn, author of "Divine Utterances: The Performance of Afro-Cuban Santeria

"An important book not only within the field of ethnomusicology itself, but for scholars in all disciplines engaged in aspects of performance--historical musicology, anthropology, folklore, and cultural studies. The individual articles offer a provocative and disparate array of threads and themes, which Solis skillfully weaves together in his introductory essay. A book of great importance and long overdue."--R. Anderson Sutton, author of "Calling Back the Spirit: Music, Dance, and Cultural Politics in Lowland South Sulawesi

Excerpt

It is rather remarkable that, in spite of the proliferation of world music performance programs and the importance of such activities in ethnomusicologists' professional lives, so little has been written about the academic world music ensemble. We aim to fill that lacuna. My fellow contributors and I, in the words of Anne Rasmussen, “hope that this volume, by problematizing our performance in the language of the academy, will provide models for our colleagues and their institutions who are trying to make a place for world music performance and its evaluation. ”

The Ethnomusicological Dilemma Manifest in Our Ensembles

During a break in a graduate seminar on ethnomusicological issues, I put on a venerable Nonesuch LP, Javanese Court Gamelan . After a couple of minutes, mildly irritated that few of the students were paying attention to the music and most were gabbing animatedly with one another, I rhetorically asked why no one was listening. Randy, a bright choral DMA candidate, pointed out to me that they were, by my own description, responding to gamelan music “as Javanese might. ” They were not listening quietly and reverently, as would an American concert audience, but rather accepting the music as a pleasant background for social interaction while awaiting a subsequent lively musical event upon which to concentrate. Feeling amiably hoist by my own petard, I admitted that our exchange nicely illustrated some issues very germane to the volume I was beginning to edit, on ensembles in ethnomusicology. It struck me that his observation encapsulated perhaps the foremost dilemma that faces ethnomusicologists: how do we rep-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.