Wordsworth's Style: Figures and Themes in the Lyrical Ballads of 1800

Wordsworth's Style: Figures and Themes in the Lyrical Ballads of 1800

Wordsworth's Style: Figures and Themes in the Lyrical Ballads of 1800

Wordsworth's Style: Figures and Themes in the Lyrical Ballads of 1800

Excerpt

Wordsworth once called language the incarnation and not the dress of thought. i Unfortunately, there exists as yet no settled terminology with which the critic can discuss intelligibly the difference between an incarnate word and a merely decorative one. To call the one imaginative and the other fanciful would illuminate things only for Coleridgeans. Two recent suggestions from Wordsworth scholars, however, indirectly raise the question posed by Wordsworth's remark in a new way. The first, from M. H. Abrams, applies to Coleridge, but is relevant here:

... almost all the examples of the secondary, or "recreative" imagination which Coleridge explicitly cites in his criticism would fall under the traditional headings of simile, metaphor, and (in the supreme instances) personifi- cation.

The second suggestion, from John Jones, is that certain of Wordsworth's metaphors might be termed "reality- . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.