Agents and Merchants: British Colonial Policy and the Origins of the American Revolution, 1763-1775

Agents and Merchants: British Colonial Policy and the Origins of the American Revolution, 1763-1775

Agents and Merchants: British Colonial Policy and the Origins of the American Revolution, 1763-1775

Agents and Merchants: British Colonial Policy and the Origins of the American Revolution, 1763-1775

Excerpt

British colonial policy in the decade preceding the American Revolution has long attracted historians, for in a few crucial years an empire which had endured, prospered, and expanded for almost two centuries was lost to England. Seeking to understand this momentous development, scholars have asked why in the years following the Peace of Paris did succeeding British ministers adopt those ill-fated measures destined to disrupt the Old Empire. By what process did they arrive at these programs ? To what extent, if any, did they consider the interests of the North American colonists for whom they legislated? In answering these questions, historians have given divergent and often contradictory explanations. This might be expected insofar as the variety of the past lends itself to many interpretations, and answers to some historical questions may be contingent upon the assumptions, background, and interests of the individual scholar. But interpretations of British policy leading to the American Revolution have varied much beyond the legitimate limits allowed by variety of outlook and research techniques.

The amount of research on imperial policy for the period 1763 to I775 has not been commensurate with the historical interest in the subject. With so much of the relevant evidence close at hand, British scholars hitherto have not devoted much attention to the problem.

Author Advanced search

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.