Old Age and Political Behavior: A Case Study

Old Age and Political Behavior: A Case Study

Old Age and Political Behavior: A Case Study

Old Age and Political Behavior: A Case Study

Excerpt

In 1950 the Institute of Industrial Relations received a sizable grant from the Rockefeller Foundation to conduct a five-year interdisciplinary study of the problem of aging in an industrial society. The plans for the study were formulated under the leadership of President Clark Kerr, who was then director of the Institute, and his associate director, the late Lloyd H. Fisher. The separate studies which eventually emerged as subdivisions of the over-all project dealt with the economic status of the aged, the politics of the aged, the relationship of physiological and psychological age to chronological age, the social and psychological aspects of aging and retirement, employer and union policies toward the older worker, and retirement policy under Social Security legislation. The responsibility for guiding the project in its final stages has fallen chiefly to Dr. Margaret S. Gordon, now associate director of the Institute.

The present volume, one of the books emerging from the study, represents the combined efforts of a political scientist, Frank A. Pinner, now at Michigan State University; a political journalist, Paul Jacobs, of The Fund for the Republic and The Reporter magazine; and a sociologist, Philip Selznick, of the University of California, Berkeley.

Ever since the years of the Great Depression, when Dr. Francis E. Townsend organized "Old Age Revolving Pensions, Inc.," California has been a center of political activity on behalf of the aged.

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