Social Unrest and Popular Protest in England, 1780-1840

Social Unrest and Popular Protest in England, 1780-1840

Social Unrest and Popular Protest in England, 1780-1840

Social Unrest and Popular Protest in England, 1780-1840

Synopsis

John E. Archer examines the diversity of protest from 1780 to 1840. This book covers all forms of protest, including the Gordon Riots of 1780, food riots, Luddism, the radical political reform movement and Peterloo in 1819. It also includes the less well researched anti-enclosure, anti-New Poor Law riots, arson and other forms of "terroristic" action, up to the advent of Chartism in the 1830s. Archer's concise study of popular protest provides a unique perspective on the social history and conditions of this crucial period.

Excerpt

In the years between 1780 and 1840 England experienced considerable change and tensions associated with the so-called Industrial Revolution, urbanisation, population growth and a long-term war with France that lasted for a generation. This book is concerned both with the disturbances and protests generated by these changes and with the debates between social historians who have studied this period. A number of parameters have been imposed on this study: namely, the coverage is restricted to England, and it ends when Chartism makes its appearance in the late 1830s.

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