The Demography of Victorian England and Wales

The Demography of Victorian England and Wales

The Demography of Victorian England and Wales

The Demography of Victorian England and Wales

Synopsis

The Demography of Victorian England and Wales describes in detail for the first time the changing population history of England and Wales between 1837 and 1914. Its principal focus is the great demographic revolution that occurred during those years, especially the secular decline of fertility and the origins of the modern rise in life expectancy. It is lavishly illustrated with numerous tables, figures and maps, many of which are reproduced in full color. This clear, comprehensive and engaging reference work makes a seminal contribution to demographic history.

Excerpt

A preface should certainly apologise and acknowledge, but it must also consider expectations, both the readers' and the author's. This is a demographic study written by a geographer. It describes and offers some interpretations of the course of demographic change in England and Wales during the Victorian era, 1837–1901. It is especially concerned with changes and variations in nuptiality, fertility and mortality, but it has relatively little to say directly on the subject of internal migration although it does devote a chapter to the consequences of urbanisation for the pattern of national mortality trends. There is no intention to make the study a comprehensive survey in which each demographic component receives equal attention. For example, childhood mortality is given an especially prominent place not only because of its interest to contemporaries especially in the early years of the twentieth century, but also because of its contribution to variations in life chances and its possible influence on reproductive behaviour. The book is not preoccupied exclusively with one period and place. The Victorian era, whilst being remarkable for the development of new statistical sources and for its position at the origin of several secular trends, cannot be treated in isolation. Much needs to be said about the early years of the nineteenth as well as the eighteenth century and the analysis will not be halted arbitrarily in 1901 or 1911. Similarly, the borders of England and Wales will be crossed when to do so would seem to enrich the account either by allowing the experiences of other regions to be 'borrowed' so that gaps may be filled by analogy or where other places offer illuminating contrasts. No one theory will be tested or methodology employed, although a critique of the demographic transition concept is bound to occupy an important position and demography amounts to very little if it cannot quantify vital events, or their absence.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.