Quantum Implications: Essays in Honour of David Bohm

Quantum Implications: Essays in Honour of David Bohm

Quantum Implications: Essays in Honour of David Bohm

Quantum Implications: Essays in Honour of David Bohm

Synopsis

David Bohm is one of the foremost scientific thinkers of today and one of the most distinguished scientists of his generation. His challenge to the conventional understanding of quantum theory has led scientists to reexamine what it is they are going and his ideas have been an inspiration across a wide range of disciplines. Quantum Implicationsis a collection of original contributions by many of the world''s leading scholars and is dedicated to David Bohm, his work and the issues raised by his ideas.
The contributors range across physics, philosophy, biology, art, psychology, and include some of the most distinguished scientists of the day. There is an excellent introduction by the editors, putting Bohm's work in context and setting right some of the misconceptions that have persisted about the work of David Bohm

Excerpt

David Bohm was born in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, in 1917. His father ran a successful furniture business, making his way to the USA from what was then Austria-Hungary. There appears to be no physics whatsoever in the family background. Bohm, himself, became interested in science at an early age, being urged on by a fascination of finding out how things worked. By the age of eight he had already been introduced to science fiction. This fired his imagination and generated in him a deep interest in real science. But it was the nature of the real world that fascinated him most. He recalls the profound effect that a book on astronomy had on him in those formative years. He was struck by the vast order and regularity of the universe. This impressed him so much that he began to devote a great deal of time to science.

Needless to say, his father became somewhat concerned about the boy’s future. Being a successful businessman, he could not imagine how anyone could make a living out of ‘scientism’ as he insisted on calling it. Young David took this as a challenge and using his earlier interest in redesigning mechanical devices he decided to try to make money out of inventing. He was rather proud of one invention in particular: namely, a ‘dropless pitcher’. (This ingenious item had nothing at all to do with that great American sporting pastime, baseball. It was a jug or teapot that did not drip!) His principal concern now became how to make this design pay. After almost giving up in despair, he came across an advertisement in a popular science magazine offering, for the sum of $5, advice on how to exploit financially a good invention. Off went the $5 and back came some advice on how to obtain a patent. But that, of course, would cost a few hundred dollars! Would it be worth it? The answer (apparently, included in the $5!) was to do a door-to-door survey to test market demand! It was at . . .

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