Scientific Thought in the American Colleges, 1638-1800

Scientific Thought in the American Colleges, 1638-1800

Scientific Thought in the American Colleges, 1638-1800

Scientific Thought in the American Colleges, 1638-1800

Excerpt

The essay which follows is a by-product of a larger investigation of scientific thought in North America before 1800, upon which I have been engaged for more years than I care to admit. The unit which it forms grew so large, and appeared to have such general interest, that I have thought it wise to publish what I have brought together here. Many readers, I am sure, will be able to correct errors and to indicate areas in which further study is desirable, and I shall be happy if they will do so. I hope, however, that these pages will prove useful to the special student and moderately entertaining to the general reader. For the sake of the latter I have, after considerable debate, placed the notes, which form a fairly extensive bibliogra phy of the subject, at the end, lest they engulf the text.

A few of the many obligations I have incurred in the gathering of this material have been acknowledged in the notes. I cannot but express my gratitude, however, to the following persons, each of whom will know how great is my debt: Mr. and Mrs. James Inglis, Howard Mumford Jones, Samuel Eliot Morison, Allyn B. Forbes, Louis B. Wright, Merle Curti, C, F. Arrowood, Frederick Eby, Donald Coney, L. C. Karpinski, and Frederick E. Brasch.

Austin, June 14, 1945 THEODORE HORNBERGER.

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