Where Are You From? Middle-Class Migrants in the Modern World

Where Are You From? Middle-Class Migrants in the Modern World

Where Are You From? Middle-Class Migrants in the Modern World

Where Are You From? Middle-Class Migrants in the Modern World

Synopsis

"Dhooleka Raj takes us into the Punjabi Hindu world in London in a very personal way, throwing light on the development of heightened religious identities in the diaspora and on Indian immigrant concerns with racial, national, and transnational identities. This engaging ethnography will enable better analytical comparisons across the Indian diasporic world."--Karen Leonard, author of "The South Asian Americans

"A trenchantly written, closely observed account of the complexities that lurk behind the innocent-sounding question that frames this revelatory book. In "Where Are You From?, Raj brings the situated engagement of the committed ethnographer to bear critically on fashionable simplifications about diaspora, identity, and the nation-state. She challenges, in a no-nonsense and grounded fashion, both our own theoretical pontifications and official platitudes about what constitutes 'British' and 'Asian' identity. In unraveling an exclusionary rhetoric of culture, she shines a much-needed searchlight onto the mutually supportive hypocrisies and uncured sores of postcolonial sensibility, and does so right at the heart of one of their major historical and cultural sources."--Michael Herzfeld, author of "Cultural Intimacy: Social Poetics in the Nation-State

" A critical and insightful ethnographic study on a timely and consequential topic. "Where Are You From? is an important and original contribution both to the anthropology of ethnicity and to critical studies of multiculturalism."--James Ferguson, author of "Expectations of Modernity

"An inventive, insightful, discerning look at what it means to live transnationally, sometimes without ever crossing a border. In this compellingaccount of global connection, multicultural politics and migration stories relate back to histories of dislocation, nation-states, 'new racism, ' and communities made in the moment, rather than a 'homeland' in any simple sense.

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