Apocalypse in Rome: Cola Di Rienzo and the Politics of the New Age

Apocalypse in Rome: Cola Di Rienzo and the Politics of the New Age

Apocalypse in Rome: Cola Di Rienzo and the Politics of the New Age

Apocalypse in Rome: Cola Di Rienzo and the Politics of the New Age

Synopsis

"Musto's work will stand alone as the definitive new study. . . . He is able to bring to life the choices and dilemmas that Cola faced, yet he is absolutely honest about what we cannot know or understand. Musto understands the institutions and mores of medieval Italy very well. [His] style is distinguished for its elegance, richness of vocabulary, and felicity of expression."--Benjamin G. Kohl, author of "Padua under the Carrara, 1318-1405"

Excerpt

In Rome on May 20, 1347, Cola di Rienzo, a young visionary with a gift for oratory, the former ambassador of the Roman commune to the pope in Avignon, the friend of Petrarch, and now papal notary in Rome, overthrew the rule of the corrupt and lawless barons, and in the name of the pope and the people of Rome reestablished the Roman republic. Cola's new government, the buono stato, was soon to restore peace, prosperity, and justice to the city and its countryside, revive the reputation of Rome's ancient grandeur, and briefly make Rome the new center of diplomacy and political life. Rome became the New Jerusalem of the Apocalypse, and the world turned its eyes to the magical city and to its wondrous ruler in rapt attention. the kings of England and France, the German emperor, even the pope and, it was reported, the sultan of Egypt, looked to Rome in awe and expectation.

This book is the story of Cola di Rienzo, of his rise to power, his coronation as tribune, his startling victories over the barons, his unexpected fall, his years of hidden wandering among the apocalyptic heretics of Italy's Abruzzi Mountains, his sudden appearance at the court of Emperor Charles iv in Prague, and his return, under arrest, to Avignon, there to stand trial as a heretic for his betrayal of the pope and the Roman church. the story then traces Cola's return to power in Rome and his death on the Capitoline near where the statue of him now stands. More than this, however, this book is a history of Rome in the fourteenth century, and of the life and hopes of its people for the dawning of a new age of peace, liberty, and enlightenment. It attempts to place Cola di Rienzo into the . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.