Enlarging NATO: The National Debates

Enlarging NATO: The National Debates

Enlarging NATO: The National Debates

Enlarging NATO: The National Debates

Synopsis

Examining the deliberations over NATO enlargement in 12 countries - five current members of the alliance; three invited to join in the first round of enlargement; two seeking membership; and Russia and Ukraine, both involved with NATO, but unlikely to join - the authors shed light on the political motives leading to each country's position. Their comparative analysis explores the interaction of domestic and international issues that is at the core of efforts to reshape the security map of Europe.

Excerpt

Transformations as dramatic as the disintegration of the Soviet Union and its communist empire, the collapse of the Warsaw Treaty Organization (WTO), and the enlargement of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) to include three Central European countries have profoundly redefined the international political system. The Cold War division of Europe came to an end, together with the totalitarian political order and economic centralization that prevailed among the Central and Eastern nations for over forty years. Communism has been replaced by democracy, free market economics, and a sweeping realignment toward the West. At the earliest possible opportunity, the entire region sought stability, prosperity, democracy, and security in alliance with the nations and international institutions of Western Europe and the United States. Ultimately, the aspiration of the many nations in this region has been membership in NATO and the European Union.

This volume, a product of these changes, was first conceptualized in the summer of 1998, when we joined the faculty of the International Summer School in Krynica, Poland. For several years the school had been organized by the Batory Foundation in Poland, with funding provided by the Soros and Ford Foundations. The program's objective was to bring together more than one hundred promising young scholars and government officials from countries and republics of the former Soviet bloc for a four-week intensive study of Western political theories, democratic institutions, and political developments. While the students were learning about the Western approach to government and society, we had the opportunity to gain a better understanding of the complexities of the region's social and economic transformations, including a comprehensive understanding of the democratic debates over the enlargement of NATO. Thus, the temptation to organize systematically the various aspects and arguments of this truly international debate became irresistible.

The idea of NATO enlargement has had broad political ramifications not only for existing members and new members of the alliance, but also for those . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.