Navigating Modernity: Postcolonialism, Identity, and International Relations

Navigating Modernity: Postcolonialism, Identity, and International Relations

Navigating Modernity: Postcolonialism, Identity, and International Relations

Navigating Modernity: Postcolonialism, Identity, and International Relations

Synopsis

"Placing the debate squarely within the discipline of international relations, Albert Paolini assesses the key personal and political dimensions of post-colonialism - one of the major political and cultural issues of the current era. Paolini is concerned with the connections among postcolonialism, globalization, and modernity, and he offers one of the first detailed statements of those connections to be undertaken in the field of IR. Focusing on the Third World, and particularly sub-Saharan Africa, he questions dominant notions of identity and subjectivity in the social sciences." Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Excerpt

Contradiction, ambivalence, ambiguity, turbulence, and dispersal: These are key defining features, suggests Albert Paolini in Navigating Modernity: Postcolonialism, Identity, and International Relations, of intersubjective connections and affective ties in current social relations and global political processes. the intertwining of intersubjectivity, modernity, and globalization are central to Paolini's analysis of postcolonialism and the status of the Third World in the multinational world system of late capitalism. For Paolini, what is at stake in recent debates about modernity and postmodernism is not simply the navigation and renegotiation of ideologies of power but rather a profound reflexive encounter with the ontological and epistemological coordinates of the social-theoretical discourses that have underpinned the disciplinary terrain and political practice of international relations itself. in this sense, Paolini's book is deeply challenging: the sheer imaginative sweep of his argument advances beyond formulaic pronouncements about the “Westernization of the world” or the “end of history, ” and instead addresses head-on the momentous subjective and institutional transformations of individual life and collective experience in an age of thoroughgoing globalization.

Navigating Modernity is at the same time a work of international relations and social theory. Paolini writes passionately and with deep insight about the repressions and evasions that have marked the disciplinary boundaries of international relations; his focus is on questions of identity, subjectivity, and modernity, particularly as they apply to postcolonial discourses and the status of the Third World. in the process, he sets forth an outline for a reflexive, postmodern approach to international relations that can locate and map forces of globality, hybridity, and ambivalence in the structuring of the Third World and its relations to world politics. the revision of international relations that Paolini calls for may be defined as an interdisciplinary, critical, imaginative investigation of aspects of daily . . .

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