The Politics of EU Police Cooperation: Toward a European FBI?

The Politics of EU Police Cooperation: Toward a European FBI?

The Politics of EU Police Cooperation: Toward a European FBI?

The Politics of EU Police Cooperation: Toward a European FBI?

Excerpt

Since the terrorist attacks on the United States on September 11, 2001, interest in internal security matters in Europe has increased dramatically. However, when I first began studying Justice and Home Affairs (JHA) in 1997, few researchers were looking at this aspect of the EU, especially the area of police cooperation. I was fortunate to be able to draw on the work of the handful of scholars who were already publishing in this field, including Cyrille Fijnaut, Monica den Boer, Jürg Monar, Roger Morgan, and Neil Walker. I rely heavily on their valuable contributions, as well as those of others. I hope that I have done justice to their pioneering work.

My examination of JHA and the European Police Office (Europol) since 1999 is based on official European Union documents obtained largely through the archives contained within the Europa website, as well as on press articles available through Lexis-Nexis, especially those of European Report, published by the European Information Service. At the later stages of my research, I was struck by how quickly official EU documents (e.g., minutes of Council sessions) started to become available and how press coverage of JHA matters increased compared to earlier years.

For a variety of reasons, my original plan for this book was to cover events only through the summer of 2001, but the attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon and the EU's reaction to these caused me to extend my work on this project by another full year. All along, I had been arguing that EU cooperation on JHA could be explained, at least in part, by events taking place outside of Europe, and the events of September 11 sadly confirmed this. I wish to acknowledge the many lives lost or changed forever on that horrible day.

Many people helped me in various ways to write this book. While an undergraduate at Colgate University, I took my first classes on European integration with Charlie Naef, who has continued to serve as a valuable . . .

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