Promoting Reproductive Health: Investing in Health for Development

Promoting Reproductive Health: Investing in Health for Development

Promoting Reproductive Health: Investing in Health for Development

Promoting Reproductive Health: Investing in Health for Development

Synopsis

Aims to determine how countries understand and are acting on the Program of Action endorsed by the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) held in Cairo in 1994. Looks at how efforts to implement that program can be assessed, and what is needed to move forward. Case studies of six developing countries help to answer broader questions regarding assistance for health and sustainable development from perspectives of both developing and donor countries. Focus is on the ICPD reproductive health agenda. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Excerpt

The nature of international cooperation in support of sustainable development has evolved over time. Development cooperation and the flow of aid between developed and developing countries in the 1950s and 1960s were strongly influenced by the politics of the Cold War and emphasized the quantitative aspects of growth through investments in large-scale infrastructural projects and scientific advancements, which were thought to be the driving engines of modernization. Theorists and practitioners alike have since recognized that, in addition to capital growth and technological advancements, social, political, and cultural progress are essential to development. the 1970s and 1980s, therefore, saw a shift toward the qualitative aspects of growth, including investments in education, health care, clean water, and sanitation, in addition to microenterprise credits and human rights. the increasing role of civil society in setting standards for effective development cooperation and collaborating in its implementation accompanied these changes, resulting, in the 1990s and into the next century, in a renewed emphasis on partnerships between and among private and public sectors, both nationally and internationally.

Several additional trends parallel these changes, including an increasing role for multilateral agencies, such as the United Nations Development Programme and other un special agencies, the World Bank, and collaborative bilateral donor forums, such as the Development Assistance Committee of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. As private-capital flows sharply outpaced bilateral and multilateral development assistance, poverty reduction replaced economic growth as the rationale for development assistance, and the needs and demands of individual clients became established as the driving force for all development activities.

The UN-sponsored international conferences of the 1990s reflect and have helped to reinforce this evolution in development thinking. Through . . .

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