An Introduction to Tudor Drama

An Introduction to Tudor Drama

An Introduction to Tudor Drama

An Introduction to Tudor Drama

Excerpt

It has been thought well that my Introduction to the Reading of Shakespeare, issued as one of the World's Manuals in 1927, should be followed by an Introduction to Tudor Drama. This volume, though planned on kindred lines, has a somewhat wider range, and appears in a different form. Its aim is to stimulate and broaden the interest in Tudor plays and playwrights. Attention has been concentrated on these, and only incidental reference has been made to stage-history.

I have endeavoured to set forth briefly the broad results of recent research and criticism, e.g. on Medwall and Rastell, Bale and Udall, Munday and Marlowe. But in a book of this scope it has not, as a rule, been possible to cite authorities, or discuss disputed points.

The term 'Tudor' has been strictly interpreted, and I have therefore not included playwrights like Ben Jonson and Chapman, whose main achievement lies in the Stuart period. Sixteenth-century drama provides abundant and ever-increasing avenues for study.

In quotations from plays acted before 1580, and from those like King Johan and Sir Thomas More, which are extant only in manuscript, I have used the original spelling. In the case of the later dramatist, from Lyly and Kyd onwards, who come whithin the Shakespearian circle, the spelling has been modernized. The comparison may be of some help and interest to students.

I am indebted to the officials of the Clarendon Press for their help in the selection of illustrations. I have to thank Professor A. W. Reed (co-editor with me of Fulgens and Lucres) and Messrs. George Routledge & Sons for permitting me to reproduce the frontispiece to . . .

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