Miles and Me

Miles and Me

Miles and Me

Miles and Me

Synopsis

"If there is a genius in music in the 20th century, it's Miles Davis, and no one has gotten more involved in his life and his music than the poet Quincy Troupe."--Barbara Christian, University of California, Berkeley

"Brilliant, poetic, provocative, Quincy Troupe's "Miles and Me "reveals the man behind the dark glasses and legend."--Ishmael Reed, author of "Mumbo Jumbo"

Excerpt

Miles Davis was a great poet on his instrument. His horn could blow warm, round notes that spoke to the deepest human emotions, and it could spit out cracked trills that evoked the angry sounds of bullets firing. Sometimes his trumpet seemed to float over and through remarkably complex rhythms and time signatures with heart-stopping speed and efficiency. His sound could penetrate like a sharp knife. It could also be muted, tender and low, like a lullaby, but it was always charged with deeply felt emotion. Miles' sound always made us sit up and take notice. It was burnished, brooding, unforgettable.

When you heard Miles on the radio, you knew right away that it was him. You knew it by the sound because no one else ever sounded like that. Like Louis Armstrong's, Duke Ellington's, Thelonious Monk's, John Coltrane's, his voice was unmistakably unique.

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