International and Comparative Employment Relations: Globalisation and the Developed Market Economies

International and Comparative Employment Relations: Globalisation and the Developed Market Economies

International and Comparative Employment Relations: Globalisation and the Developed Market Economies

International and Comparative Employment Relations: Globalisation and the Developed Market Economies

Excerpt

This book summarises traditions and issues in employment relations in ten significant developed market economies (DMEs)—the UK, the USA, Canada, Australia, Italy, France, Germany, Sweden, Japan and Korea. We discovered the need for this book while researching, consulting, and trying to encourage people to understand international and comparative industrial relations (IR) and human resources (HR) in Australia, Britain, the USA and elsewhere.

In this fully revised edition of the book, the introductory and concluding chapters explore trends across DMEs in general. The book begins by showing why international and comparative employment relations is an important area of study. It goes on to consider some of the relevant methodological problems and to evaluate some of the most influential theories in this field. (Some may prefer to read both of these general chapters before they read the more specific national chapters.)

A chapter is devoted to each of the countries, which all belong to the 'rich countries' club'—the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The first four of these countries have comparable adversarial traditions: the UK, the USA, Canada and Australia. The next four are on the European continent. Two are Latin countries, with strong postwar traditions of communist and Catholic unionism: Italy and France. The next two are from northwestern Europe and have developed distinctive approaches to industrial democracy and skills formation: Germany and Sweden. The other two countries are in . . .

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