Inevitable Partnership: Understanding Mexico-U.S. Relations

Inevitable Partnership: Understanding Mexico-U.S. Relations

Inevitable Partnership: Understanding Mexico-U.S. Relations

Inevitable Partnership: Understanding Mexico-U.S. Relations

Synopsis

This volume describes the complex Mexico-US relationship from the beginning of the 19th century through to the end of the 20th century. Chapters explore the evolution of the relationship covering issues affecting the partnership such as globalization, immigration, and illegal narcotics trading.

Excerpt

The 2,000-mile border shared by Mexico and the United States is unique in its separation of the First World from the Third. Across that border, though, there is a daily flow of millions of economic, political, social, and cultural interconnections that make the two countries increasingly interdependent. This phenomenon—whether welcome or not—binds Mexico and the United States into an inevitable partnership. The challenge is to learn to work in a collaborative style to manage the complexities of that relationship in a mutually beneficial way.

In this book I explore the nature of the interdependent MexicoU. S. relationship and find that it is essentially asymmetrical. During the earlier years of the relationship, this asymmetry—in industrial and technological capacity, in economic and military power—created an image of a weak Mexico dependent on the “Colossus of the North. ” Not too long ago a conventional description of the binational relationship would have stressed Mexico's “dependence” on the United States and the “exploitative” role of U. S. and other transnational corporations vis-à-vis Mexico. The reader will discover why this is no longer true, if it ever was.

Perhaps more important to an understanding of U. S.-Mexico relations than economic asymmetries are the sharp cultural and historical differences between the United States and Mexico. As a famous Mexican philosopher remarked, “I as a Mexican am part of a singular paradox—that of Mexico and the United States. Our countries are neighbors, condemned to live alongside each other; they are separated, however, more by profound social, economic, and psychic differences than by physical and political frontiers” (Paz, 1985a).

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.