Orestes A. Brownson: A Pilgrim's Progress

Orestes A. Brownson: A Pilgrim's Progress

Orestes A. Brownson: A Pilgrim's Progress

Orestes A. Brownson: A Pilgrim's Progress

Excerpt

The measure of what is historically important is set by the generation that writes the history, not by the one that makes it. No historian can entirely escape judging by the standards of his day; in some sense he must always superimpose one set of values on another. Only a few figures in each age survive this process of sifting. They are men of many facets, reflecting light from whatever angle they are viewed. Others, not of the first importance, nor perhaps of the second, bulk large in the eyes of the people who knew them, but fade to vague names within a decade of their funerals, and in another may be wholly forgotten. Who in the America of 1860 remembered Herman Melville or knew of Stendhal or Karl Marx? But who did not know of N. P. Willis, of Eugene Sue, of Orestes Brownson?

1

At the end of the eighteenth century, Vermont, not ten years a state, was slowly yielding its green . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.